501(c)3

 

Why are foodways important?

Foodways is the study of what people eat and why. Why we procure, prepare and serve the food we do has cultural, sociological, geographical, financial and political influences.

 

 

Why is recognition of diverse foodways valuable?

Preserving our past and present for the future by research, documentation and oral histories. It is culinary anthropology on the hoof, paw, root and leaf.

 

 

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Arkansauce, The Journal of Arkansas Foodways, Issue 1, 2011

Arkansauce is a new journal created by the Special Collections Department of the University of Arkansas Libraries to explore food history, customs, and traditions in the Natural State. Rex Nelson is the guest editor of the inaugural issue. Read it online:

 

Arkansauce, The Journal of Arkansas Foodways, Issue 1, 2011

You can read this online or in print by making a free subscription request to Diane F. Worrell at dfworrel @ uark.edu or phone 479-575-5577 or write Special Collections Dept, University of Arkansas Libraries, 365 N. McIlroy Ave, Fayetteville, AR  72701.

 

***

 

Call for Menu Donations
As a part of its foodways initiative, Special Collections is seeking to build a collection of Arkansas menus. While we are especially seeking older menus, recent ones will be welcomed too. We are looking for:
• Restaurant menus
• Menus for special events
• Menus for family meals, such as descriptions of meals in handwritten letters

If you wish to donate a menu, please mail it to or contact Timothy G. Nutt, Assistant Department Head and Manuscripts Librarian, University of Arkansas Libraries, Special Collections Department, 365 N. McIlroy Avenue, Fayetteville, AR. 72701, phone: 479-575-8443, e-mail: timn@uark.edu.

 

***

 

Poking around their site, I found:  http://libinfo.uark.edu/eresources/wholehog.asp, a research tool combing through a number of databases simultaneously.

International Association of Culinary Professionals Annual Meeting

LIGHT YOUR FIRE: Sparks from the Culinary Edge

 

June 1-4, 2011
Austin, TX

 

 

Constant innovation. That’s the credo of every culinarian. Whether inventing new recipes, exploring new technologies, probing new views of food history or acting on the issues of our day – innovation is our collective quest. It’s the flame that keeps us asking: What’s new? What’s next? What better way to stoke your fire than to join IACP in Austin, the seat of progressive thought and entrepreneurship in the heart of Texas. In this hotbed of invention, we’ll hear from renowned culinarians who are sparking new ideas around the world, personally and professionally; we’ll taste the best Texas has to offer, including some amazing local products. And we’ll look to other industries—music, technology, trend research—for transformative ideas. Ignite your creativity.

 

Join IACP for the conference of the year in Austin, June 1 - 4, 2011. Register online today at http://www.iacp.com/conference. Or for more information call 1-800-928-4227 or email us at 

info@iacp.com

New Zealand Symposium for Food History, Auckland, 25-27 November 2011, Call for Papers

The New Zealand Symposia for Food History are meetings devoted to the discussion of food history. They began in 2005 and are intended to promote greater understanding of New Zealand’s culinary heritage. The Symposia are intimate, friendly and encourage networking and discussion. They also always include good meals.

Registration is open to all with an interest in food history, production or literature.


 

Subjects of papers at past Symposia have included: church holiday camps, prisoners of war, restaurants, biographies of cook-book authors, hunting, barbecues, Maori culinary tradition, seafood recipes, nutritional advice, harvest festivals, microwaves, manuscript cook books, database management, Christmas dinners, home-economics teachers, catering for tourists, restaurant reviews, food banks.


 

Papers are sought on the theme of the 2011 Symposium: The 1920s

The 1920s was the decade the Pavlova cake first appeared, as well as the Caesar salad, Smith’s Crisps, Birdseye frozen food, and Vegemite. Dominion Breweries was founded in the twenties, Farmers department store opened its famous Auckland tearooms at the beginning of the decade, and rebuilt it in art-deco style at the end of the decade, and Aunt Daisy, New Zealand’s original celebrity cook, first appeared on the radio (as a singer).


 

The 1920s was a time when many ‘modern’ ideas were applied to food, for example in: nutrition, manufacture, marketing, state policy, education, agriculture, urbanism, restaurants, economics, science, publishing, kitchen appliances and design.


 

New Zealand gastronomy is a melting pot. Ethnic influences by the 1920s included the indigenous Maori, predominant British Isles, North American, Chinese, Indian, Lebanese, Jewish and Continental European.


 

The 1920s were bookended by the First World War and the Great Depression. Papers could be comparative studies of those periods, or indeed cover a larger chronological period that includes the 1920s.


 

New Zealand represents a microcosm of global food culture, especially for gastronomy and consumerism in the post-colonial Anglo world. Papers could cover any region in the world in comparison to New Zealand.


 

Papers must be no longer than 45 minutes in duration.


 

Abstracts, together with a short biography of the presenters (multiple presenters and roundtable discussions are welcome) should be submitted, by 30 September 2011, to:

andretaber@xtra.co.nz

 

www.nzfoodhistory.org.nz

www.aucklandnz.com


 

 

IACP Conference, June 1-4

International Association of Culinary Professionals
LIGHT YOUR FIRE: Sparks from the Culinary Edge
June 1-4, 2011
Austin, TX
Constant innovation. That’s the credo of every culinarian. Whether inventing new recipes, exploring new technologies, probing new views of food history or acting on the issues of our day – innovation is our collective quest. It’s the flame that keeps us asking: What’s new? What’s next? What better way to stoke your fire than to join IACP in Austin, the seat of progressive thought and entrepreneurship in the heart of Texas. In this hotbed of invention, we’ll hear from renowned culinarians who are sparking new ideas around the world, personally and professionally; we’ll taste the best Texas has to offer, including some amazing local products. And we’ll look to other industries—music, technology, trend research—for transformative ideas. Ignite your creativity.
Join IACP for the conference of the year in Austin, June 1 - 4, 2011. Register online today at www.iacp.com/conference. Or for more information call 1-800-928-4227 or email us at info@iacp.com

 

Culinary Curiosity Exhibition at Kendall College in Chicago

Culinary Curiosity Exhibition at Kendall College. An Online virtual museum features retrospective of nearly 300 culinary, baking and confectionary cooking tools. More than 130 items from the exhibition are featured on the Web site along with descriptions and videos about their manufacture, origin and use, as well as the solutions they provided in the era during which they were employed. This unique “virtual museum exhibit” can be found at http://www.culinarycuriosity.org.

A free tour of The Culinary Curiosity Exhibition at Kendall College can be arranged by contacting Patsy Caruso, Executive Director of the Kendall College Charitable Trust, at pcaruso@kendall.edu or 312-752-2352.

Roger Smith Food Writers' Conference, Feb 12-14 in NYC

The food writing craft is in transition and if observers and technologists are to be believed, many more changes are soon to come. It's time for food writers to examine these trends and discuss the future of food writing. This is the purpose of the "Roger Smith Food Writers' Conference," scheduled for February 12-14, 2010, at the Roger Smith Hotel in New York City. This conference is not sponsored or underwritten by anyone or any group (other than the hotel which is giving us free space).


The program is still in formation. The beta-version of the website for the conference is now online:
http://rsfoodwriters.posterous.com/

 

We'll be adding more to the website soon.

Questions and comments are welcome.

Andy Smith

www.andrewfsmith.com

"Is There a Midwestern Cuisine? Culinary Identities of the American Heartland"

Culinary Historians of New York
  

"Is There a Midwestern Cuisine?

Culinary Identities of the American Heartland: Fish Boils, Fish Fries, the Cudighi and Runza, Ohio Mango, the Coney and Big Baby"

 
Bruce Kraig, PhD.
 
Date: Wednesday, October 14, 2009
Time: 6:30pm - 8:30pm
Location: Park Avenue Methodist Church
Street: 106 East 86th Street
City/Town: New York, NY 
 
At a food conference not long ago, a wit was heard to quip, "Midwestern food? Why, nothing but casseroles." And white ones at that, she should have added. A history stickler might have replied that essential casserole ingredients, such as Campbell's cream of mushroom soup, hail not from the Midwest but from New Jersey. But why quibble? The remark was intended to say that Midwesterners, unlike Southerners or New Englanders, have no distinctive culinary sensibilities.

 
Bruce Kraig is a vivacious speaker and will tease apart the many threads that form the fabric of Midwestern cuisine and will argue that, contrary to popular belief, Midwestern foodways express a rich cuisine that defines cultural identity as much as Southern fried chicken or a New England clambake. (Yes, pie will play an important role).
Bruce Kraig is the founding President of Culinary Historians of Chicago. With a Ph.D. in History and Archaeology, Dr. Kraig is Professor Emeritus in History and Humanities at Roosevelt University, Chicago. An internationally recognized food historian, he has been host and writer for a series of award-winning food documentaries for PBS, is a regular speaker at the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery, and has written several cookbooks.
 
Midwestern treats will be served!
 
Location:
Park Avenue United Methodist Church
106 East 86th Street (b/w Park and Lex)
 
Time: 6:30 pm Check-In and Reception | 7:00 pm Lecture
 
Fee: $40 Non-Members and Guests | $25 CHNY Members |$22 CHNY Student & Senior Members
 
Join CHNY (cash or check) at the door of this event, and you'll attend at the Member rate!
Or join online now (via Paypal), at your option: http://www.culinaryhistoriansny.org/join.html
Click here to purchase tickets securely online via Brown Paper Tickets: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/producer/7199
(Or, for tickets to be paid at the door (cash or check), RSVP to "Events" at http://www.culinaryhistoriansny.org/contact.html)

Southern Foodways Alliance

Music and Food: Exploring Interdependent Cultural Expressions

 

 

2009 Delta Divertissement October 29–30, 2009 (Sold Out)
2009 Southern Foodways Symposium October 30–November 1, 2009 (Tickets Still Available)

 

For more information and registration, click here. (http://www.southernfoodways.com/events/symposium/index.html)

 
The twelfth Southern Foodways Symposium will be held October 30—November 1, 2009, in and around the town of Oxford and on the campus of the University of Mississippi. The Delta Divertissement, now in its seventh year, will take place October 29—30 in nearby Greenwood and Indianola. Both events will explore music and food as intertwined evocations of Southern peoples and places.

 
Over the course of four days of lectures and performances, as well as breakfasts, dinners, and suppers, we will unlock the key to what Memphis Minnie really meant when she sang, "I’m selling my pork chops/But I’m giving my gravy away."

 
New Orleans will get its due, by way of red beans and rice and jazz. So will Texas blues. And Tennessee country. And hip hop from the ATL.

 
We’ll stage a ballet and a goat roast. We’ll feed on deep-fried catish and slow-simmered greens. We’ll take you down to the crossroads where food and music meet, and we’ll sketch the ways in which these cultural expressions are complementary.

 
These events are programmed to provide opportunities for academics, writers, cooks, and intellectually curious eaters to come to a better understanding of Southern culture and Southern cookery. Lectures, staged on the University of Mississippi campus, as well as in Oxford, at the Lyric Theatre and the Powerhouse, will be amplified by informal lunches and dinners, served in and around the town.

Introducing Stories Matter: Open Source Database Building Software

Introducing Stories Matter: Open Source Database Building Software

 

After nearly a year of interdisciplinary collaboration among affiliates of the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling at Concordia University in Montreal, the first phase of Stories Matter is complete. In its current state, Stories Matter is free, open source software that is compatible with Macintosh and PC operating systems. It allows for the archiving of digital video and audio materials, enabling users to annotate, analyze, evaluate and export materials, as well as tag, index, search, and browse within interviews, sessions, and clips or across entire collections.

 

We have been successful in creating what we believe is an extremely convenient and intuitive software that will inspire oral historians to continue listening to their interviews long after the interviews themselves are completed. While Stories Matter may not replace transcription for many oral historians, it will undoubtedly compliment it due to its ability to allow users to create convenient video and audio clips for research purposes and integrate them into such presentation software as PowerPoint. Furthermore, we believe users will be impressed by the software’s ability to preserve important forms of communication typically lost in transcription, including changes in tone, volume, rhythm, and body language, allowing for more nuanced analysis.

 

Thus, we invite you to visit the new Stories Matter website at www.stories-matter.com where you can download the software and begin using it locally to build a database or series of databases from your personal collection of interviews. The Stories Matter Instructional Manual is embedded the software, and can be downloaded to your desktop by selecting the appropriate option from the Help Menu.

 

And continue following the Stories Matter blog http://storytelling.concordia.ca/storiesmatter/) for updates on the development of Phase II of Stories Matter, which will begin on July 15th.  Its purpose is to enable increased collaboration among oral historians by providing an intuitive online database tool that can assist group projects and encourage public engagement. Phase II of Stories Matter is scheduled to be completed in December of 2009, with a public launch to follow shortly thereafter.

--
Erin Jessee, PhD Candidate
Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling
Concordia University
Montreal QC

AIWF: "Farm to Fork: An Agricultural Primer for Foodies"

Join the American Institute of Wine & Food and the Chicago Botanic Garden for a unique symposium exploring the history, factors and forces impacting today’s agricultural choices from an engaging line-up of national experts in nutrition, the environment, legislation, economics and rural development.  It will definitely be food for thought. 

 

Saturday, October 3rd

9:00-5:00

Chicago Botanic Garden (map) 

$125 Full Day/ $85 Half Day*

To register, call 847.835.8261 or visit http://www.aiwf.org/chicago/contentpage/index.html?id=10 for more information 

 

For those who are passionate about food, this is an extraordinary opportunity to broaden your view of the issues and how they intertwine to impact our lives. It’s also the perfect chance to meet Chicago chefs renowned for their commitment to sustainability and watch them prepare some of their favorite dishes showcasing local foodstuffs.   

 

Program Content

Bill Kurtis, President of Kurtis Productions and Founder of Tallgrass Beef, will speak on the history and geography that shaped the food systems in Illinois.

Ann Wright, Senior Agricultural Policy Advisor with the Office of Senate Majority Leader, Harry Reid, will explain the impact of legislation on agricultural systems.

Sandra Batie, Elton R. Smith Professor in Food and Agricultural Policy at Michigan State University, will explore the complex nature of food supply chains.

Richard Manning, award-winning environmental author and journalist, will look at our agricultural footprint in terms of energy, emissions, water and waste.

Chuck Hassebrook, Executive Director, Center for Rural Affairs, will discuss the changing landscape of our rural communities and new opportunities for small farmers.

Neil Levin, Nutrition Education Manager and Product Formulator at NOW Foods, will talk about nutritional differences in organic, conventional and biotech foods. 

After the symposium, join the speakers and chefs for cocktails and hors d'oeuvres in the Rose Garden or take a tour of the Regenstein Fruit & Vegetable Garden.  

 

Detailed Agenda: http://www.aiwf.org/chicago/contentpage/index.html?id=10

Speaker Bios: http://www.aiwf.org/chicago/contentpage/index.html?id=11 

 

* Join AIWF or the CBG and qualify for the discounted price of $100 Full Day or $60 Half Day